5 proven Pickleball tips for Intermediate players to level up their game

Pickleball players in the intermediate level don’t have to guess. They can analyze and execute the shots required to win the rally. They’re not just attempting to stay in the game; they’re also hitting and placing strokes.

That indicates they’re hitting third shot drops and hitting at their opponent’s feet while keeping the other players back.

If you’re an intermediate or advanced pickleball player, these tips are for you!

Let’s get started with the 5 intermediate-level tips

Pickleball tips for Intermediate players

Dink with intent

You’ll need to be able to dink early and successfully if you want to play at the 3.5-4.0 level. It’ll also help if you understand what a purposeful dink is and why you’re doing it in the first place.

If you want to get to a 3.5 or higher, this is one of the best tips. The ability to control your dinks distinguishes the good players from the beginners.

  • Cross Court Dink Shot

Practice the cross-court dink for another terrific tip for their dink shot.

Why would you want to go across the court? Think about it and “dink” about it. It’s around 20 feet from one corner of the non-volley zone to the other. On the other hand, a straight dink is just approximately 14 feet from your non-volley line and the non-volley line of the opposing team.

In addition, the net’s center is the lowest point.

All of this adds up to a more significant margin of error and a better chance of hitting the dink shot regularly. Advanced players not only hit the better shot, but they also hit more of them.

You can shift the other team around by focusing on shot location after you get that shot tuned in.

  • Dink Tips

Keep your wrist cocked at nearly a 90-degree angle when dinking a forehand stroke. This keeps your wrist from getting in the way of the shot. In addition, it enables you to use a swiping gesture instead of a shot action.

Consistency is crucial when hitting a dink shot. For example, you can improve texture by keeping your wrists locked and hitting the shot with your shoulder.

Furthermore, the wrist cock makes applying backspin to the dink shot easier. You can hit the ball a little higher with a backspin while still knowing it will bounce low.

Lock your wrist in a neutral position for a backhand dink. The rest of the shot is identical to the forehand shot. Feel as if you’re engaging the movement with your shoulder.

Get your paddle up

I’m thrilled to be the one to drill this into your mind if you haven’t already heard it a million times.

Is the top of your paddle head higher than your wrist? Why not, if not?

The “ready position” for a rally involves getting your paddle up. If you forget this suggestion, you might get a hard-hit shot right at your body, which, let’s face it, is a rather embarrassing situation.

You can reset by raising your paddle and bringing your feet back to a neutral position. But, again, you’re much more likely to hit a well-placed shot back if you’re in an athletic, ready place than hope it goes over if you’re in an athletic, ready posture.

See : Essentials to keep in mind before choosing a pickleball paddle in 2022?

Recognize the attack

The non-volley zone attack is the most misunderstood and mismanaged shot in all pickleball.

Contrary to popular belief, not every ball can be attacked.

In pickleball, the opponent’s unforced error is the preferred shot. To win that rally, you essentially have to do nothing. It’s a strategy that always works.

However, as you advance in level, you can no longer rely on your opponents making mistakes, and you must occasionally begin an attack. Don’t hesitate to attack the ball if it is higher than the net and you are in a position to do so.

So, what is the solution? Attack? Is it worth it to wait for an unforced error? If you remember only one pickleball advice today, remember this one: 90 percent of pickleball points are won at the net. So, prepare to attack as well as be attacked.

Intermediate players understand the value of patience. This implies that you should not always be looking for a game-winning shot. In some cases, a well-placed soft shot can be just as dangerous as a hard drive.

Know your shots

You are not required to execute each shot flawlessly. However, knowing what shots you have and concentrating on the ones you excel at (pickleball is a strength-based sport) will help you compete at an intermediate level.

Focusing on trick shots and heavy spin is not a viable tactic for low intermediate pickleball players.

You will win most of the time if you stick to the basics, perform them well, and do them consistently. However, as you go through the levels, expanding your toolset will help you to become less predictable.

Drill it out

What were your expectations? Is it possible that it’s a magical bean? Is it possible to develop a Lucy Kovalova backhand counter-attack overnight?

Most people can get from beginner to intermediate pickleball quickly and simply by playing games. However, your progress chances are pretty intense if you have a background in tennis, racquetball, table tennis, or badminton.

Also : Best Pickleball Sets in 2022

However, if you want to grow as an intermediate or experienced pickleball player, you’ll need to drill.

Find someone to feed you pickleball to drive and drop, or your most miniature favorite drill, as your colleague cranks out 65-75 percent effort overheads at your feet over and over.

At least one game of thin singles should be played at the end of your drill session. It’s a great chance to put what you learned earlier in the day into practice.

Conclusion:

Pickleball tips for intermediate players are more concerned with obtaining control and consistency than simply improving.

Someone new at pickleball is getting the hang of the moves. As your game improves, you’ll begin to hit shots with more purpose.

To become an intermediate or advanced player, it takes time to enhance your pickleball game.

I guarantee that if you execute these five things regularly for three or four months, your intermediate pickleball skills will improve.

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